Tag - fea tip

12
Jul

FEA Modeling Guidelines | MSC Nastran

Finite element modeling in many ways is more like an art than a science since the quality of the results is dependent upon the quality of your model. One of the more common errors that a beginning finite element analyst makes in modeling is to simply simulate the geometry rather than to simulate both the ...
12
Jul

Taking Advantage of Symmetry in FEA | MSC Nastran

When you think of a symmetrical structure, you most likely think of a structure that has one or more planes of reflective symmetry. Although there are other kinds of symmetry available in MSC Nastran, reflective symmetry is the only type that is discussed in this section. MSC Nastran also provides a series of special solution ...
12
Jul

Properly Applying Loads to Finite Elements | MSC Nastran

In finite element analysis, the loads are often applied to the elements rather than to the grid points. Examples of such loadings include the edge load on a CQUAD4 element or a pressure load on one of the faces of a solid element. When you convert these element loads to grid point loads, a common ...
12
Jul

Making Sense of FEA Node (Grid Point) Stresses | MSC Nastran

When you are working with a structure that is modeled with either plate or solid elements, it is quite common that you may want to look at either the printed output or contour plots of the element component stresses. If this is the case, extra care must be taken on your part to ensure that ...
12
Jul

The Best FEA Mesh Transition | MSC Nastran

Mesh transition can be a complicated subject. It may simply be used to refine the mesh in a particular area, connect different element types (for example, a CBAR element to a solid element), or provide transitions required to model the geometry of the structure. Two guidelines for mesh transitions are as follows: Never place a ...
12
Jul

The Best FEA Mesh Density for Accuracy and Speed | MSC Nastran

The mesh density in a finite element model is an important topic because of its relationship to accuracy and cost. In many instances, the minimum number of elements is set by topological considerations, for example, one element per member in a space frame or one element per panel in a stiffened shell structure. In the ...
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